All I want for Xmas is a Little Peace and Quiet . . .

The Holiday season after brain injury . . .  Many people look forward to the holiday season to catch up with friends and celebrate with family at social gatherings and events.  Then there are those who dread the holidays . . . After a brain injury you may find yourself one of those who dread the holidays.  Social gatherings take on a whole new meaning when you struggle to follow multiple conversations due to slowed processing,  memory impairment, concentration difficulties and a tendency toward over-stimulation. All of these symptoms are common after a brain injury. These and other brain injury symptoms can make social engagements a lot of work.  At the end of a night of trying to concentrate and remember and keep up with the conversation a person with a brain injury can be exhausted! If you or someone you know lives with a brain injury pace yourself this holiday season. I encourage couples who live with brain injury to talk about events and prioritize which ones they really want to attend and keep tabs on the fatigue levels of the brain injury survivor.  If fatigue levels are high, generally all other symptoms of brain injury are exacerbated.  Plan an exit strategy or a way for the survivor to get away from the crowd to take a brain break. Make an effort to include some downtime this holiday season. In general, people tend to run themselves ragged in the name of Holiday Celebrations.  In honor of those who need a little peace and quiet this holiday season, I encourage everyone to take a break.  Find a simple way...